www.yingangphoto.com

"…through her photographs she questions our perception of safety and danger in our closest environment and examines what images connote with those two terms."

Book review on This Is Paper Magazine

"Maris Bustamante makes an impassioned case for the power of new, transdiciplinary, and visual ways of knowing the world. In general, she argues, "we do not see what we see," but rather "what we have been made to see," as a result of the compartmentalized, "rationalized" structures of Western European thought… She ends with a call for "accomplices" to use "demystifying humor" to carry out "the most eccentric actions" that will help to prepare us to confront "other truths" long hidden by the dominant modes of thought that serve to reproduce inequality and injustice."

Editors’ Introduction: Art, Power, and Social Change; Emmanuel A. David and Edward J. McCaughan

PREACH

I wanna see our bodies burning like the old big sun

Come dance with me

Languid furnace of the city in heat. Hot wind, shimmering asphalt, planes carrying sneaker and short clad tourists in from the mid west through a pale blue smog sky. Thin film of sweat salty on my skin. Summer in New York for a week. Tomorrow, California.

Book review on Feature Shoot:
"Drenched in sunshine and suburbia, Ying Ang‘s Gold Coast is brimming with images we come to expect from Australia. Despite its sweeping aesthetic, the series is drowning in darkness, an ominous truth lying in wait in the city’s quiet streets. Once labelled a tourist capital, the Gold Coast region has become infamously named the crime capital of Australia. Ang herself was a significant witness to a double murder attempted suicide, exposed at a young age to the seedy underbelly of the place she calls home.
The work is examination of how people perceive safety and danger depending on their environment. Dubbed “a sunny place for shady people” by the media, Gold Coast appears to be a tranquil landscape full of neighborhoods and backyard BBQs. Ang’s slightly shifted perspective allows the cracks to bleed through, exposing a surreal and unsettling world just beyond our view.” View high resolution

Book review on Feature Shoot:

"Drenched in sunshine and suburbia, Ying Ang‘s Gold Coast is brimming with images we come to expect from Australia. Despite its sweeping aesthetic, the series is drowning in darkness, an ominous truth lying in wait in the city’s quiet streets. Once labelled a tourist capital, the Gold Coast region has become infamously named the crime capital of Australia. Ang herself was a significant witness to a double murder attempted suicide, exposed at a young age to the seedy underbelly of the place she calls home.

The work is examination of how people perceive safety and danger depending on their environment. Dubbed “a sunny place for shady people” by the media, Gold Coast appears to be a tranquil landscape full of neighborhoods and backyard BBQs. Ang’s slightly shifted perspective allows the cracks to bleed through, exposing a surreal and unsettling world just beyond our view.”

Peeled an egg this morning and my eyes glazed over. Entered that fugue state that often comes to me when I’m engaged in a domestic chore that is less action and more automated response. Was thinking about love. It occurred to me that the familiar is not something that I want anymore. I don’t want the kind of love that I can recognize. I want a new kind of love. Something that rings no bells.

I also realized that in all my running through life and the hellbent efforts to escape all the things that I felt trapped by, I had inadvertently created a life for myself where the opposite of those hurts couldn’t find me either. I had effectively woven a net that protected me from predator and also prey. I am a toothless shark, a grey shadow slipping across the bleached ocean floor, starved and unmarked.

Reminded me of a quote by C.S. Lewis…

“To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully around with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. 
But in that casket – safe, dark, motionless, airless – it will not change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable.” 

Book review on CANVAS by Grolsch.
"Ang doesn’t take us directly, à la Blue Velvet, under the manicured lawn to see the swarming, revolting bugs. Rather she lets the violence remain implicit, with reflections that disembody her subjects, and architecture that fosters their transgressions." View high resolution

Book review on CANVAS by Grolsch.

"Ang doesn’t take us directly, à la Blue Velvet, under the manicured lawn to see the swarming, revolting bugs. Rather she lets the violence remain implicit, with reflections that disembody her subjects, and architecture that fosters their transgressions."

YET Magazine Book Review
Title of publication: The Gold CoastName of artist: Ying AngEditor: Self publishedYear of publication: 2014Edition size (number of copies): 800Bindig: Chevron patterned hardcover with pale pink screen printed boxType of printing: Offset printing on matte coated paperBook Size: 9.6 x 11.2 inchesNumber of pages: 132 pagesNumber of pictures: 72 colour imagesPrice: USD$ 70
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From Wikipedia
“Gold Coast is a coastal city in southeastern Queensland on the east coast of Australia. The city is 94 kilometres (58 mi) south of the state capital Brisbane, is the sixth most populous city in the country, and the most populous non-capital city in Australia, while the origin of the city’s name is debatable, the name “Gold Coast” was bestowed upon the city by real estate investors.The Gold Coast is today a major tourist destination with its sunny subtropical climate, surfing beaches, canal and waterway systems, its high-rise dominated skyline, theme parks, nightlife, and rainforest hinterland, making tourism one of its most significant industries.”
Gold Coast is also “the crime capital of Australia.”
Ying Ang, who grew up and lived for 17 years in Gold Coast, was an eyewitness to a murder as a child.
In The Gold Coast book, self published in 2014, Ying puts the viewer in front of the huge conflict that lies between the streets of this city. Everything is neat, well-kept houses, the sun is shining, the beaches are packed, and crime is prosper. The inhabitants of Gold Coast are trapped in this contradiction, coming to deny the evidence, claiming to live in a perfect place, where life is beautiful and where all is well, while newspaper headlines recite the exact opposite.
In the book, starting with the cover, all is played in a constant sense of disorientation, of contradiction, the viewer immediately realizes that in the photographs something is not right before our eyes. In Ying’s images nothing is explicit, warm and delicate tones, masterly studied compositions, chosen details, they are all the perfect metaphor to describe this city and its inhabitants.
Ying’s work is certainly very personal and lunge from any documentary ambitions. Subjects are often friends, people close to her who have chosen to live and to have a family that is aware of the situation around them.We go from urban glimpses to scenes of the everyday life, in homes that already seem familiar, stolen snapshots and candid portraits, as if the author wants to show us this world without formality, without shame, without hypocrisy. But always in order.
Like in a screen play, every photograph is a scene from the film, written and directed by the artist, a chapter, a paragraph of the story. Ying’s view remains suspended between childhood’s innocence and the brutal awareness of adulthood so that some images, completely surreal in their simplicity, seem like a flashback from a dream.The chosen photographic language goes perfectly with what is the intent, which is to create empathy. Image after image, as in a movie, we identify ourselves with the places and characters. The scenes follow one another, rhythmically, creating a thin and constant tension, such as the blade of a knife, but without ever losing elegance.
The choice of self-publishing doesn’t come by chance. This is exactly the book Ying Ang wanted to accomplish, her experience, the story she chose to tell, in the way she wanted to tell it.
As stated in the subtitle of the book “A TALE OF UNEXPECTED MENACE”.


By Elena Vaninetti View high resolution

YET Magazine Book Review

Title of publication: The Gold Coast
Name of artist: Ying Ang
Editor: Self published
Year of publication: 2014
Edition size (number of copies): 800
Bindig: Chevron patterned hardcover with pale pink screen printed box
Type of printing: Offset printing on matte coated paper
Book Size: 9.6 x 11.2 inches
Number of pages: 132 pages
Number of pictures: 72 colour images
Price: USD$ 70

-

From Wikipedia

Gold Coast is a coastal city in southeastern Queensland on the east coast of Australia. The city is 94 kilometres (58 mi) south of the state capital Brisbane, is the sixth most populous city in the country, and the most populous non-capital city in Australia, while the origin of the city’s name is debatable, the name “Gold Coast” was bestowed upon the city by real estate investors.The Gold Coast is today a major tourist destination with its sunny subtropical climate, surfing beaches, canal and waterway systems, its high-rise dominated skyline, theme parks, nightlife, and rainforest hinterland, making tourism one of its most significant industries.

Gold Coast is also the crime capital of Australia.”

Ying Ang, who grew up and lived for 17 years in Gold Coast, was an eyewitness to a murder as a child.

In The Gold Coast book, self published in 2014, Ying puts the viewer in front of the huge conflict that lies between the streets of this city. Everything is neat, well-kept houses, the sun is shining, the beaches are packed, and crime is prosper. The inhabitants of Gold Coast are trapped in this contradiction, coming to deny the evidence, claiming to live in a perfect place, where life is beautiful and where all is well, while newspaper headlines recite the exact opposite.

In the book, starting with the cover, all is played in a constant sense of disorientation, of contradiction, the viewer immediately realizes that in the photographs something is not right before our eyes. In Ying’s images nothing is explicit, warm and delicate tones, masterly studied compositions, chosen details, they are all the perfect metaphor to describe this city and its inhabitants.

Ying’s work is certainly very personal and lunge from any documentary ambitions. Subjects are often friends, people close to her who have chosen to live and to have a family that is aware of the situation around them.
We go from urban glimpses to scenes of the everyday life, in homes that already seem familiar, stolen snapshots and candid portraits, as if the author wants to show us this world without formality, without shame, without hypocrisy. But always in order.

Like in a screen play, every photograph is a scene from the film, written and directed by the artist, a chapter, a paragraph of the story. Ying’s view remains suspended between childhood’s innocence and the brutal awareness of adulthood so that some images, completely surreal in their simplicity, seem like a flashback from a dream.
The chosen photographic language goes perfectly with what is the intent, which is to create empathy. Image after image, as in a movie, we identify ourselves with the places and characters. The scenes follow one another, rhythmically, creating a thin and constant tension, such as the blade of a knife, but without ever losing elegance.

The choice of self-publishing doesn’t come by chance. This is exactly the book Ying Ang wanted to accomplish, her experience, the story she chose to tell, in the way she wanted to tell it.

As stated in the subtitle of the book “A TALE OF UNEXPECTED MENACE”.

By Elena Vaninetti

~ Showcased on Lensculture ~
Had the opportunity to meet the gracious Jim Casper from Lenculture in Arles a few days ago. We began with a conversation, which is always the most lovely and gentle way to start a review. We ended with a promise of friendship and a shared understanding of the world. 
The next day, I wandered into the COSMOS book section and walked in on him punching his credit card details into the machine as he was paying for a copy of my book. What a doll. View high resolution

~ Showcased on Lensculture ~

Had the opportunity to meet the gracious Jim Casper from Lenculture in Arles a few days ago. We began with a conversation, which is always the most lovely and gentle way to start a review. We ended with a promise of friendship and a shared understanding of the world. 

The next day, I wandered into the COSMOS book section and walked in on him punching his credit card details into the machine as he was paying for a copy of my book. What a doll.

Just spent the week at Les Rencontres d’Arles… a photography festival in the south of France of epic proportions. I’m now sitting in a hotel room in London, trying to make some sense of the whirlwind of activity that swept me up and left me spent, exhilarated and in awe at the grace of the people that helped me so much with getting this book seen.

I had about 30 meetings in 5 days and sold all the copies that I could spare in my suitcase. 

I’m still in shock.

The greatest realisation that I had in the making of this book is that I’ve never produced anything of this magnitude before. In size, in weight, in significance, in effort. I had managed, by some miracle, to photograph a feeling that I carried around for 17 years. A twisted river of ennui and suburban oppression, where crimes committed in sunshine are forgiven easily. 

It was the most extraordinary feeling to be validated like that… And to share something that I had felt so alone in for most of my life. And if I can somehow bring that to a viewer who has experienced the same, it almost makes those 17 years worthwhile.